Transforming Lives Through The Love of Christ
cross

The Cross

About twenty years ago Rick Boland and a few guys from our church put together a cross and placed it on the front lawn of our church.  It is simple.  Two pieces of wood put together.  The years have weathered it to a dullish gray.  In its simplicity and plainness it is beautiful.  The cross has survived storms and hurricanes, blizzards and heat waves.  Through the years and the seasons the cross in front of our church has stood strong.  For many it is a landmark:  “The church with the cross in front of it.”  I like to think of it as a beacon in our community, sending a message of love without the use of words, without preaching, without glitz or or bling.  It does not bring attention to itself but you can’t help but notice it.  It does not cry out as much as it calls to.  I have always loved this cross.

  
    The blue sky is a beautiful backdrop.               So is the white snow.
  
Every Good Friday we “Nail Our Sins To The Cross” and come back Easter Morning to see they have been taken away.
The Apostle Paul said: “May I never boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world.”
(Galatians 6:14).

 “Jesus, keep me near the cross;
there a precious fountain,
free to all, a healing stream,
flows from Calvary’s mountain.
In the cross, in the cross,
be my glory ever,
till my raptured soul shall find
rest beyond the river.”

Last weekend the winds blew so hard that they knocked that old, rugged cross down. I was shocked and sad when Tony text a picture of it to me. I couldn’t believe it.   It will take more than three days but like Jesus, it will rise again.  And it will resume to be a landmark and a beacon, a light to the community and a sign of love and hope.
 When I see a cross I automatically think of Jesus and what He did for us.  If an old, worn out, inanimate wooden cross could serve as such a symbol, provide such inspiration, emanate such beauty and have such an impact, just imagine what us living human beings, made in the image of God, created as masterpieces, could do for the communities we live in and the word around us.  Maybe we could actually be the “lights to the world” and the “salt of the earth” that Jesus described us to be.
What do you think?
How does this make you feel?
Shalom,
Steven